BREWING AND BEVERAGE INDUSTRY ESPAÑOL

Spanish Language Trade Magazine



BREWING AND BEVERAGE INDUSTRY ESPAÑOL can also be found in our international magazine portfolio. This Spanish language trade magazine focuses on the brewing and beverage industry in Latin America and the Iberian Peninsula, but also features topics from the international beverage industry.

Relying on the editorial competence of the two established trade publications BRAUINDUSTRIE and GETRÄNKEINDUSTRIE, the editorial team of the BREWING AND BEVERAGE INDUSTRY ESPAÑOL provides qualified, closely researched, on-the-spot reporting.

BREWING AND BEVERAGE INDUSTRY ESPAÑOL is thus an indispensable decision-making tool for experts operating within the Spanish-speaking brewing and beverage industry.

News

Designer Wheat bred for Whisky Distillers

Rothamsted scientists have bred a type of wheat specifically to improve whisky production. The group’s lead researcher says this new wheat will reduce the processing problems, higher energy use, and wear on pumps caused by using current wheat varieties.

Dr Rowan Mitchell said: “At present using wheat grain is a problem for distilleries because it causes sticky residues that mean the whole distillery must be shut down for cleaning. Our novel wheat is designed to have grain with low levels of soluble dietary fibre and should greatly decrease these problems. Great for making whisky, but the opposite to what’s required by bakers.” He added that the development will also make UK grown wheat more desirable for use in whisky compared to imported maize, which is currently easier to process.

This new wheat line is one of the first wheat varieties in the world developed using ‘reverse genetics’ - where scientists start with knowledge of what a gene does, rather than screening for the trait in a plant first and then looking for which of its genes are responsible. Their non-GM approach, called Tilling, allowed them to rapidly breed their gene of choice into an existing wheat variety. The group focused in on genes they discovered that controlled the amount of a chemical found in plant cell walls called arabinoxylan, responsible for soluble fibre levels and what determines its viscosity.

By using traditional plant breeding methods, they created wheat lines where these genes had stopped working – referred to as ‘knock out’ or loss of function lines. In these lines, the arabinoxylan molecules where both shorter and fewer in number, leading to a whisky-friendly wheat that produces a liquid extract between 50 and 80% less ‘gloopy’ compared to wheat without the knock-out genes. Interestingly, the team saw that the plant responded to this change by increasing the bonds between the remaining arabinoxylan molecules, which helped it maintain the size and shape of its cells.

The group have a patent on the use of the gene for this application and are now working with plant breeding company Limagrain to develop a new commercial variety.  Co-author Dr Simon Berry, marker specialist at Limagrain, said: “There is going to be a pilot scale test on about a quarter of a tonne of grain at a distillery this year and we are aiming for an official trials entry within the next 5 years. “Low viscosity wheat would strengthen the continued use of UK wheat in distilling and offer a solution to those distillers still using maize.”


Team

Wolfgang Burkart
Economist
CEO

+4982619990

Decorated Holder of the Bavarian Beer Medal, avowed Cuba fan and, of course, “Keeper” of Mindelburg Castle.

Benedikt Meier
M. Sc. Brewing Science
Editor

+498261999311

Transformed his office into a coffee plantation. Expects the first harvest to be ready by the time he’s ready to retire.

Sabine Reggel
Media Consultant

+498261999338

A rockstar who revels throughout the Allgäu, Sabine loves to be in her yard and enjoys the occasional juicy steak.

 

Sandra Wulkan
Advertising

+498261999335

Big fan of Disney movies. Especially Mickey Mouse and Star Wars. Does not miss any movie.

 

Susann Winterhoff
Sales / Subscriptions

+498261999455

Let the games begin: she's ready to drop anything when there's fun to be had at games night.

Barbara Onischko
Editorial Assistant

+498261999325

With her green thumb she has transformed her garden into a year-round, idyllic refuge.

 

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Designer Wheat bred for Whisky Distillers

Rothamsted scientists have bred a type of wheat specifically to improve whisky production. The group’s lead researcher says this new wheat will reduce the processing problems, higher energy use, and wear on pumps caused by using current wheat varieties.

Dr Rowan Mitchell said: “At present using wheat grain is a problem for distilleries because it causes sticky residues that mean the whole distillery must be shut down for cleaning. Our novel wheat is designed to have grain with low levels of soluble dietary fibre and should greatly decrease these problems. Great for making whisky, but the opposite to what’s required by bakers.” He added that the development will also make UK grown wheat more desirable for use in whisky compared to imported maize, which is currently easier to process.

This new wheat line is one of the first wheat varieties in the world developed using ‘reverse genetics’ - where scientists start with knowledge of what a gene does, rather than screening for the trait in a plant first and then looking for which of its genes are responsible. Their non-GM approach, called Tilling, allowed them to rapidly breed their gene of choice into an existing wheat variety. The group focused in on genes they discovered that controlled the amount of a chemical found in plant cell walls called arabinoxylan, responsible for soluble fibre levels and what determines its viscosity.

By using traditional plant breeding methods, they created wheat lines where these genes had stopped working – referred to as ‘knock out’ or loss of function lines. In these lines, the arabinoxylan molecules where both shorter and fewer in number, leading to a whisky-friendly wheat that produces a liquid extract between 50 and 80% less ‘gloopy’ compared to wheat without the knock-out genes. Interestingly, the team saw that the plant responded to this change by increasing the bonds between the remaining arabinoxylan molecules, which helped it maintain the size and shape of its cells.

The group have a patent on the use of the gene for this application and are now working with plant breeding company Limagrain to develop a new commercial variety.  Co-author Dr Simon Berry, marker specialist at Limagrain, said: “There is going to be a pilot scale test on about a quarter of a tonne of grain at a distillery this year and we are aiming for an official trials entry within the next 5 years. “Low viscosity wheat would strengthen the continued use of UK wheat in distilling and offer a solution to those distillers still using maize.”


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